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Seaport's 150 Seaport Boulevard to be the St. Regis Residences, Boston. Billowy 22-story tower will have 114 luxury condos.

By Tom Acitelli, Curbed Boston

Rendering courtesy of Cronin Development

The famously billowy condo tower planned for 150 Seaport Boulevard, on the Seaport District sites of the Whiskey Priest and the Atlantic Beer Garden, will open as an outpost of the St. Regis luxury brand, according to developer Cronin Development.

The firm reached a licensing deal with Marriott International, which is not itself involved in the development. 

The tower is due to have 114 condos and to reach to 22 stories. A groundbreaking is expected this fall, with an opening scheduled for late 2020. 

Such an opening will cap a long time of back-and-forth on the plans. The Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental group, agreed in January to drop a lawsuit against the project in exchange for $13.1 million in funding for a waterfront park, a public dock, and children’s programming.

The group had opposed Cronin’s (very expensive) plans on zoning grounds because of concerns about public access to the waterfront.

As it stands now, the future condos will come with access to a suite of St. Regis-branded luxury services, including concierge and butler service, and to amenities such as a swimming pool, a spa, a health club, a library, and what the developer is calling a golf-simulation room. 

Then there’s the design of the building itself, courtesy of the late Howard Elkus of Elkus Manfredi. It is meant to evoke a billowy sail. 

Stay tuned for sales (the other kind). Those are expected to launch in the fall.

Tim Marsh Lists a Two Bedroom Condominium on the Front of the Four Seasons!

Four Seasons two bedroom overlooking the Boston Public Garden!

Priced to sell at $2,575,000 or $1,798 per SF; $621 below the average sale price per SF of the last five front facing residence at the Four Seasons at 220 Boylston Street.  At 1,432 SF with two bedrooms, two baths, garage parking and views into the Public Garden, that leaves plenty of room to put your signature on this luxury condominium property and still be "in the market".

         

Check out this properties web site!  http://220boylston1013.com/flyer/pdf.ashx?oid=2202685&ot=213&title=220boylston1013.com

Or view it on MLS.  https://h3v.mlspin.com/MLS.Reports/ListingDetails.aspx

 

Contact Exclusive Broker Tim Marsh at 617-548-7145 or tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com for more info or to set up a private viewing.

Boston's height limit: Will the city ever pierce 800 feet?

Tom Acitelli of Curbed Boston

Boston, Downtown, Massachusetts, Scenic

In much the same way that the middle-class is unlikely to enjoy a renaissance in Boston, developers are unlikely to ever pierce 800 feet in terms of building height.

At least not for the foreseeable future.

The city’s tallest building by 2020 will be the same as it is today: 200 Clarendon (the former Hancock), which stretches to 790 feet at its tallest architectural detail, not counting antennae and other apparatus. 

The second-tallest will also be the same, too: The 749-foot Pru. 

The third will likely be new: The under-construction One Dalton hotel-residential tower in Back Bay is slated to stretch to 742 feet at its highest architectural feature. 

After these three, Boston’s 10 or so tallest buildings by 2020 will stretch little beyond the 700-foot mark. 

What’s holding the city back from building to 800 feet, 900 feet, (gasp!) 1,000 feet? The sagas of two arrested developments—both garage conversions, in fact—illustrate the answer.

Developer Millennium Partners had at one point proposed building a 775-foot mixed-use tower, including condos, at the site of the shuttered Winthrop Square Garage at 240 Devonshire Street. (Millennium bought the garage from the city, and originally proposed a still-significant 750-foot project, before bumping that to 775 feet in November 2016.)

Then concerns about the shadows such a tower would cast on landmarks slowed the requisite approvals. Then federal regulatory concerns about the effects of such a height on planes in and out of Logan slowed approvals some more. 

So the height started dropping—first to 702 feet and then to 691 feet at the start of 2018. The project would still pencil out to 1.6 million square feet of space, including 640,000 square feet of condos. But the height, it’s 84 feet off the boldest plan. 

And even with such reductions and a relaxation of state rules governing shadows in Boston’s historic core, the Winthrop Square Garage project remains uncertain nearly 18 months after Millennium reached a deal with the city to acquire the garage. 

Attempts to redevelop another Boston garage stretch back much further than the efforts at Winthrop Square. 

The Chiofaro Co. has owned the 1,380-space Boston Harbor Garage at 270 Atlantic Avenue since 2007, and has been trying to redevelop it pretty much since then.

Previous projects have included a two-tower complex that included hotel rooms and condos—and an ice rink as part of a year-round open space—and a single skyscraper with offices and condos.

Disputes with the neighbors, including the New England Aquarium, have held up the plans, however, and, while the single-tower proposal appeared to take a big step forward last winter, plans still remained up in the air.

That was until February 2018, when the Boston Planning and Development Agency proposed allowing Chiofaro to build a tower as high as 600 feet in exchange for establishing a fund worth up to $30 million to compensate the aquarium for any disruptions and to set aside parking for the institution. 

Chiofaro would also be on the hook for a so-called Blueway extension of the Kennedy Greenway. Moreover, open public space would have to be a sizable part of Chiofaro’s development under the BPDA plan.

All in all, the plan would allow for the tallest tower ever along Boston Harbor. Chiofaro appears amenable to the deal’s terms, including the aquarium’s indemnification against loss of visitors/business.

Still, the tower might yet tarry: The state could take up to two months to review the BPDA plan; then it’s another round of local and state permitting; and Chiofaro hasn’t settled on a final design to even propose.

There is also continuing opposition from the owners in the neighboring Harbor Towers complex.

An amalgam of regulatory hurdles, neighborhood concerns-slash-opposition, seemingly unchangeable infrastructure, and Boston’s simple geography appears to be the insurmountable obstacle to building beyond 800 feet. 

Meanwhile, the city continues to grapple with an infamous housing crunch that causes Manhattan-esque prices and to work overtime to draw and retain commercial tenants

What’d you think? In your lifetime, will you see an 800-footer in Boston? 

Tim Marsh closes on another exclusive sales listing at the Four Seasons at the Public Garden!

This beautifully renovated two bedroom luxury condominium sold for an all-time record high for a rear-facing unit at $1,769 per SF!

The property sold within 2% of the list price of $2,195,000 in just 17 days!

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?

                       

Check this property out!    https://h3v.mlspin.com/MLS.Reports/ListingDetails.aspx

Tim Marsh - Owner/Broker

New Issue of The Real Estate Insider Newsletter. Mid-Year Review - full of info about your Boston Real Estate Market!

Click on the following link to check out our new mid-year issue of The Real Estate Insider.  We've been providing our readers with timely data, offerings and sales reports on the Boston real estate market since 1992.  

https://s3.amazonaws.com/files.usmre.com/5309/7.24.17%20RE%20Insider.pdf

This new issue includes some very interesting, if not unexpected, data on the following topics:

Five-Year Sales Summary of Boston's Tier-1 Doorman Condominium Buildings.

Mid-Year Condo Sales Review of each major Boston Neighborhood in the <$1M, $1-3M and $3+M price ranges.

The Best Time of Year to Sell.

Tim Marsh

(C) 617-548-7145

tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com

Check out our New Website for one of Boston's Grandest Condominium Homes - 257 Commonwealth in the Back Bay!

Click on the following link to visit the website for this magnificent home in the historic Cochrane Mansion.  List Price: $11,250,000 http://www.257commonwealth3.com/?cpref=100

 

Quintessential Back Bay Condominium With All the Right Touches!

         

257 Commonwealth Avenue was built circa 1886 for industrialist Alexander Cochrane by the renowned firm of McKim, Mead & White - architects of the Boston Public Library and the East and West Wing renovations at the White House.  The Cochrane House was developed into six private residences in 1985.  Residence 3 is a rare and coveted combination of the entire parlor and second floors, connected by a grand elliptical staircase and overlooking the Commonwealth Mall.  The parlor floor features the mansion’s original public rooms - perfect for entertaining on a grand or intimate scale.  The centerpiece is the forty-foot Great Hall. Today it serves as this condominium home’s elegant entrance foyer and a family room at the opposite end. The drawing room, bay windowed living room and dining room are accessed from the Hall, allowing for excellent flow.  Adjacent full, updated kitchen. Powder room.  Palatial 900+ SF private deck.  The second floor offers a masterful entertaining salon with a full kitchen.  Powder room.  Library.  Master bedroom with a marble bathroom and large walk-in closet en suite.  Two-three additional family bedrooms.   Adjacent full bath.  Additional features and amenities include massive pocket doors, soaring coffered ceilings, stunning wood and plaster detail, seven fireplaces, central air, W/D and keyed elevator access.  Two full garage spaces.  Professionally managed Association.

Price:  $11,250,000       Size:  5,930 Interior SF.    900+ SF Private Deck.    

Contact Exclusive Listing Broker, Tim Marsh for a private viewing.  

(C) 617-548-7145    email:  tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com