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Tim Marsh

Tim Marsh Lists a Luxury Two Bedroom Plus Den at the Full Service Trinity Place for $3.1M!

Rare "Nose" unit overlooking Copley Square.  Palatial single floor condo at Trinity Place, a Tier-1 full service doorman building centrally located in Copley Square. Residence features: Entry foyer with closet. Gallery entry hall.  Fabulous 26’ living room with postcard views of the Trinity Church, Boston Public Library, John Hancock tower and Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel. Chef’s granite-accented kitchen. Adjacent utility room with washer/dryer.  Master bedroom suite offers a sitting room, two closets and a marble-accented master bath with double-sink vanity and linen closet.  Guest bedroom with walk-in closet and en-suite full bathroom.  Den/study with built-in bookcase/cabinets. Powder room. Includes two valet garage spaces and extra storage.  Services include elevator, 24/7 concierge, valet and on-site management.  Residents enjoy in-room dining from Sorellina Restaurant, a private entrance into the restaurant and a residents-only fitness center.  Convenient access to routes 90, 93, 1 and the Back Bay Train station.

         

       

Contact Tim Marsh for a private viewing.

Cell:  617-548-7145. Email:  tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com

Originally Priced at $1,500,000, This Full Service Home at Battery Wharf Has Been Re-Priced at $1,395,000 for A Timely Sale!

Don't miss out on this fantastic buying opportunity!  Beautiful South-facing one bedroom full service condominium in coveted Battery Wharf on Boston Harbor.  This oversized home offers nearly 1,300 SF.  Large 27' open living room with Brazilian cherry wood floors, dining area and step-out balcony offering direct Boston Harbor views.  Open chef's kitchen features stainless steel appliances, gas cooking and granite counters.  Large master bedroom suite is replete with custom built-in cabinetry, numerous windows with Harbor views, custom walk-in closet and a luxurious marble bathroom en suite with double-sink vanity, soaking tub and large shower stall. Additional powder room. One valet garage parking space and private storage.  Washer & dryer.  Battery Wharf amenities include doorman, concierge, security, on-site professional management and fitness room.  The attached Battery Wharf Hotel offers offers in-room dining and housekeeping services. The Battery Wharf Grill, Exhale Spa and Marina and Water Taxi (Logan Airport service) are on-site.   Located on the Boston Harbor and close to the fine dining of the North End, TD Garden/North Station and major routes.

             

               

Contact Tim Marsh for a private viewing of this property.
Cell:  617-548-7145.  Email: tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com

Originally priced at $1,659,000, this pristine full service home has been re-priced at $1,300,000 for a timely sale!

 Priced at only $689 per Square foot, don't miss out on this high floor 2BR , 2.5 Bath 1,886 SF home in the full service Macallen Building.   Unit highlights include: Large private terrace with Boston Harbor and city views.  Large LR with lofted ceilings, linear electric FP, wet bar, picture window and wood floors.  S/S and granite kitchen with dedicated eating area and direct access to the terrace.  Master bedroom with full. bath en-suite.  Second bedroom with adjacent full bath.  C/A.  W/D.  Full size garage space included.  Building amenities include:  24/7 concierge.  Elevator.  On-site professional management.  Garage parking.  Palatial 18,000 SF landscaped rooftop garden with heated lap pool and multiple gas grills.  Fitness Center.  Club room with kitchen.  Bike storage.  The Macallen is located in South Boston just south of the Financial District and close to many restaurants, major routes, a Whole Foods market and public transportation.  Gold LEED Certified Building built circa 2008.  Price:  $1,300,000.

         

 

Contact Tim Marsh to schedule a private viewing.  

Cell:  617-548-7145.  Email:  tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com

Demo Underway for St. Regis Residences in the Boston Seaport

Courtesy of BLDUP.  Latest Boston Real Estate Development News

 

Demolition of Whiskey Priest & The Atlantic Beer Garden along Boston's waterfront has begun to make way for the upcoming St. Regis Residences.  Once the bars have been cleared work will start on the 22 story tower that will hold 114 luxury residences. The project also calls for around 10,000 sf retail space and three levels of underground parking.  

Construction is expected to be complete in around 2 years.

About St. Regis Residences, Boston

150 Seaport Boulevard, Seaport DistrictBoston, MA

Upcoming 22-story mixed-use waterfront building in Boston's Seaport District. The St. Regis Residences, Boston will contain 114 residential condominiums. 10,700 square feet of ground and second level retail space and three levels of underground parking. The ground floor space will feature a signature restaurant. A Harborwalk extension will be built around the building. The project will be built at the present site of the Whiskey Priest and Atlantic Beer Garden waterfront restaurants. The following is a rendering of St. Regis Residences, Boston:

Tim Marsh Appointed Exclusive Listing Broker for Another Four Seasons Luxury Condo Overlooking the Public Garden!

Rare front-facing two bedroom luxury condominium boasts one of Boston's most coveted addresses across from the Boston Public Garden.  The condo features postcard views of the Boston Public Garden, Boston Common, Beacon Hill and the Back Bay.  Amenities includes 24/7 world-class concierge services, one valet or self-park garage space, fitness center, heated lap pool overlooking the Public Garden, direct phone line to the concierge and hotel and direct access to the AAA Five Diamond and Mobil 5 Star Four Seasons Hotel.  Four Seasons in-room dining and housekeeping services are available.  List Price:  $2,995,000.

Contact Tim Marsh to set up a private showing.  

(C) 6178-548-7145.  

tim@bostonluxuryrealestate.com. 

 

 

Downtown Boston's Motor Mart Garage slated for major redevelopment.

Courtesy of Tom Acitelli of Curbed Boston

The owners of the Motor Mart Garage at 201 Stuart Street in downtown Boston’s Park Square area have proposed planting a 20-story tower atop the 1,037-space facility.

If it gets built, the Motor Mart Garage tower would be the latest major conversion and/or replacement of a Boston parking facility recently, joining the ranks of the Government Center Garage and the old Winthrop Square Garage. 

That Park Street tower would have 306 apartments and condos as well as 672 parking spaces, including 144 for residents of the units above. The plans from CIM Group and Boston Global Investors would also add about 46,000 square feet of restaurant and retail space to the site.

The plans are in flux, of course. CIM and Boston Global are still looking at how to meet city requirements for affordable housing. And the scope and design might change under public scrutiny. But the would-be developers are not leaving one thing in particular to chance:

The winter solstice creates the least favorable conditions for sunlight in New England. The sun angle during the winter is lower than in any other season, causing the shadows in urban areas to elongate and be cast onto large portions of the surrounding area. 

At 9:00 a.m. during the winter solstice, new shadow from the Project will be cast to the northwest onto a portion of the Boston Public Garden and nearby rooftops. No new shadow will be cast onto nearby streets, sidewalks, or other public open spaces. 

At 12:00 p.m., new shadow from the Project will be cast to the north and will be limited to nearby rooftops. No new shadow will be cast onto nearby streets, sidewalks, bus stops, or public open spaces. 

At 3:00 p.m., new shadow from the Project will be cast to the northeast onto a portion of the Boston Common, and onto Tremont Street and its sidewalks as well as nearby rooftops. No new shadow will be cast onto nearby bus stops or other public open spaces.

Fall vs. Spring - Debunking the Myth

Tim Marsh Sells Another Full Service Luxury Condominium in the Four Seasons at the Public Garden!

Tim Marsh sells a palatial and beautifully renovated full service penthouse condominium at the Four Seasons to one of his direct customers.  Two units were seamlessly combined to create this 2,760 SF 3+BR, 3 bath residence at the world-class Four Seasons at 220 Boylston Street, across from the Boston Public Garden.  Features include a 25' living room with architectural ceiling, fireplace and wall of picture windows.  Chef's kitchen with all the bells and whistles.  Three bedrooms plus den/4th BR.  Sumptuous master bedroom suite with huge walk-in closet and spa-like bath.  Two self-park or valet garage spaces.  

Five Star services from the Four Seasons Hotel include a fitness center and heated lap pool.  In-room dining is available.  Direct access to the Hotel lobby and the popular Bristol Lounge and Restaurant.  Conveniently located across from the Public Garden and Boston Common.  Close to the Financial and Back Bay Business Districts, Theatre District and the famous Newbury Street shops and restaurants.  

List Price:  $5,600,000

     

Seaport's 150 Seaport Boulevard to be the St. Regis Residences, Boston. Billowy 22-story tower will have 114 luxury condos.

By Tom Acitelli, Curbed Boston

Rendering courtesy of Cronin Development

The famously billowy condo tower planned for 150 Seaport Boulevard, on the Seaport District sites of the Whiskey Priest and the Atlantic Beer Garden, will open as an outpost of the St. Regis luxury brand, according to developer Cronin Development.

The firm reached a licensing deal with Marriott International, which is not itself involved in the development. 

The tower is due to have 114 condos and to reach to 22 stories. A groundbreaking is expected this fall, with an opening scheduled for late 2020. 

Such an opening will cap a long time of back-and-forth on the plans. The Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental group, agreed in January to drop a lawsuit against the project in exchange for $13.1 million in funding for a waterfront park, a public dock, and children’s programming.

The group had opposed Cronin’s (very expensive) plans on zoning grounds because of concerns about public access to the waterfront.

As it stands now, the future condos will come with access to a suite of St. Regis-branded luxury services, including concierge and butler service, and to amenities such as a swimming pool, a spa, a health club, a library, and what the developer is calling a golf-simulation room. 

Then there’s the design of the building itself, courtesy of the late Howard Elkus of Elkus Manfredi. It is meant to evoke a billowy sail. 

Stay tuned for sales (the other kind). Those are expected to launch in the fall.

Boston's Neighborhoods: How They Got Their Names.

By Tom Acitelli of Curbed Boston

Geography, infills, independence movements—all played roles in shaping the city’s positional vocab.Felix Mizioznikov/Shutterstock

Boston is named after the town of Boston in eastern England. But what about the city’s neighborhoods? A lot of them have similar roots in old Albion, while a sizable chunk are tethered etymologically to geography. 

Read on for the origin stories of Boston’s 22 large neighborhoods.

Allston

This neighborhood was for years simply the stockyards and rail yards of the town of Brighton. It also had a post office and quite a bit of woodlands. 

One gentlemen who liked to hike the woodlands was the painter Washington Allston, who lived across the Charles River in Cambridge.

By the time Boston annexed the area in 1874, it was known by his surname.

Back Bay

This photo from 1858 shows the Back Bay on the left and the Charles River on the right.  Public domain.

There is a reason many people call this neighborhood the Back Bay: From 1857 to 1882, one of the largest urban infrastructure projects in U.S. history filled in about 450 acres of pestilential tidal basin known colloquially as “the Back Bay.” 

Beacon Hill

 

A depiction from 1811 of the reduction of Beacon Hill to 80 feet from 138.  Wikimedia Commons

Multiple hills—some say three, some say five—comprised what became Beacon Hill, one of the first settled areas on the Shawmut Peninsula.

One of those hills became known as Beacon Hill because of a signaling beacon on it; and the name stuck. 

Bay Village

The smallest neighborhood that the city itself breaks out, Bay Village was born in the 1820s as the collection of homes for the workers who built the tonier nearby Beacon Hill. Therefore the architecture looks similar. 

Bay Village used to go at various times by the Church Street District, South Cove, and Kerry Village. Bay Village stuck, perhaps given its immediate geographic proximity to the pre-infill Back Bay. 

Brighton

Brighton was its own town until Boston annexed it in 1873. 

By that point, it had been independent for only about half a century; and, before that, was known, along with what became Allston, as an agricultural and cattle-rustling appendage of Cambridge that went by the diminutive nickname Little Cambridge. 

It changed its name to Brighton, after a town in southern England, upon independence in 1807. 

Charlestown

Charlestown was named for—wait for it—an English king named Charles; in this case, Charles I, the Stuart on the losing end of the English Civil War. 

Europeans began settling what became Charlestown in 1629—20 years before Charles I lost his head—and it remained an independent municipality until 1874, when Boston annexed it. 

Chinatown

This neighborhood is named after its predominant ethnic group; though rising housing costs and other reasons for emigration have reduced the number of residents of Chinese descent. 

Dorchester

A regional map from 1858.  Walling, H. F.—David Rumsey Collection

Boston’s largest neighborhood by area is named for Dorchester, a town in southern England. 

Dorchester, USA, was an independent town until 1870, when Boston gobbled it. As a town, it included parts of what became known as South Boston. 

East Boston

The infill-spurred linkage over 150 years of five islands east of Boston formed this neighborhood. And the “east of Boston” bit gave it its name. 

The neighborhood’s private developers saw to its annexation to Boston in 1836. 

Fenway

Frederick Law Olmsted’s plans for the Back Bay Fens, circa 1887  Public domain

Take your pick: This neighborhood’s name came either from the Back Bay Fens, a park that landscape architect extraordinaire Frederick Law Olmsted designed, or from a road that ran along it. Fens, incidentally, is a term to describe a marshy or flood-prone area, which this eventual neighborhood was.

Boston annexed Fenway and its Kenmore Square and Audubon Circle areas from Brookline in the 1870s.  It’s sometimes called “the Fenway”—often an unconscious nod to the theory that the neighborhood was named for the road. 

Hyde Park

Boston’s southernmost neighborhood—and the last to be added through annexation, in 1912—is named after the park in London dating from the 1630s. 

Jamaica Plain

This is another tossup in terms of origin. JP was either named after the Caribbean island from which some residents drew their wealth via the slave-driven rum and sugar trades; or after the Anglicization of the name of a Native American leader. 

Or! As in the case of Jamaica in Queens, New York, it comes from the name of a Native American tribe called the Jameco. 

JP became part of Boston in 1874. Interestingly, it was part of the town of Roxbury and parts of Jamaica Plain became the town of West Roxbury.