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Pier 4 Residences

Interior Finishing Wrapping up for Pier 4 Luxury Condos

Courtesy of Bldup

About Pier 4 Phase II

130-140 Northern Avenue, Seaport DistrictBoston, MA

Tishman Speyer's second phase of their $500 million Pier 4 development project overlooking Boston Harbor. featuring a nine-story residential building containing 106 luxurious one-to-four-bedroom condominiums with 17,000 square feet of ground-floor retail. The building will feature a rooftop terrace and state-of-the-art amenities. Pier 4 will include a one-acre public waterfront park. A two-level underground parking garage will be located on site.

Each condominium at Pier 4 will feature private outdoor space; penthouse condominiums will also feature private roof decks. Pier 4 will offer the only Seaport residences surrounded by water on three sides. Resident amenities will include pet-friendly conveniences, an exclusive residents club, an expansive outdoor terrace, a seating and dining area with a fire pit, a luxury fitness center with state-of-the-art equipment, virtual golf, and on-site self-parking and valet.

On the ground floor of the residential building will be the Seaport's first farm-to-table restaurant. The restaurant will be operated by Kristin Canty, owner of Concord, MA's Woods Hill Table, and will have 140 seats, including a raw bar, along with a 40-seat patio. On the office building's ground floor will be a location of Tatte Bakery & Cafe over 3,600 square feet in size.

Boston had nation's worst rush-hour traffic congestion in 2018

By Tom Acitelli - Curbed Boston 

Boston drivers wasted an average of 164 hours in rush-hour traffic in 2018, the highest total among U.S. cities, according to a new report from research firm INRIX

The company analyzes millions of bits of data for its annual Global Traffic Scorecard. Boston always scores rather high, but this year the city appears to have rated particularly bad. 

For the first time, too, INRIX looked at commutes in terms of peak (slowest travel times) versus inter-peak (fastest point between morning and afternoon commutes) travel times. In Boston on average, commutes increased 27 percent during peak versus inter-peak hours.

There was a bit of good news in the report. “[I]n cities like Boston, Washington, D.C., and Chicago, a higher proportion of trips are taken via public transportation, walking, or cycling.” Any car trips then are more likely to be related to business, the report said—unlike in, say, Los Angeles, where everyone drives everywhere for everything. In fact, INRIX said that L.A. was the most car-dependent city of the top 10. 

A rundown of that top 10 is below. 

Perhaps its status as the U.S. city with the worst rush-hour traffic will drive Boston’s leaders to reconsider congestion pricing once again. Or maybe the T will be fare-free sooner rather than later.

Tim Marsh - Owner/Broker

Marsh Properties, Inc.